• Prosecutors in Washington will consider charging an 18-year-old woman who pushed her teenage friend off a bridge, sending her plummeting 60 feet to the river below and leaving her with multiple injuries, officials said Tuesday. Clark County Major Crimes unit investigators wrapped up their probe of the incident that occurred earlier this month at the Moulton Falls Bridge near Vancouver, Washington, and are turning over their findings to prosecutors, said Brent Waddell, a spokesman for the Clark County Sheriff's Office. "The case will be forwarded to the Clark County Prosecutor's Office for appropriate charging," Waddell said in a statement.

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  • Saudia Shuler was charged with six counts of wire fraud, one count of theft of government funds, and two counts of Social Security fraud, according to CBS Philly.

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  • "I've gotta finally treat myself," NFL veteran Rob Gronkowski realized. "It's been eight years."

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  • Omarosa's Book Claims Melania Trump Wants to Divorce Donald Trump

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  • An American woman has become the youngest person in the US to receive a face transplant, after shooting herself in the face in an attempted suicide when she was 18. Katie Stubblefield, now 22, is featured on the front cover of this month’s National Geographic, guest edited by former model and campaigner Katie Piper. In March 2014, depressed and suffering from a series of medical problems, she shot herself in the face with her brother Robert’s rifle at his home in Tennessee. Mr Stubblefield said he found her covered in blood, with her face “gone.” The bullet tore through her forehead, nose, sinuses, jaw bones and badly damaged her eyes. Surgeons responsible for saving her life in Memphis attempted to cover her facial wound using a tissue graft from her abdomen, but failed, and she arrived at the Cleveland Clinic with “her brain basically exposed.” The September issue of National Geographic Credit: National Geographic Miss Stubblefield underwent 22 different operations to try and repair the damage, but doctors were unable to satisfy their patient, who was in despair, and referred to her face as Shrek. “Things happen in life that shatter us to pieces,” said her father, Robb. “But it’s where we go from there.” After three years of waiting, and after two potential donors fell through, a donor was found. Adrea Schneider, a 31-year-old woman who had recently died from a drug overdose, was a registered organ donor. Her grandmother Sandra Bennington gave consent for the donation, and Miss Schneider’s heart, lungs, kidneys and liver were also donated to other patients - saving at least seven lives across the US. In May 2017 Miss Stubblefield underwent a 31-hour surgery at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, Adrea Schneider, whose face was donated to Miss Stubblefield Credit: National Geographic becoming the 40th person in the world known to have received a new face. The youngest person ever to receive a face transplant is believed to be a Turkish man, Ugur Acar, who was 19 when he was operated on in 2012, to provide him with a new face after being badly burnt in a house fire when he was a baby. Dr Brian Gatsman, who oversaw a team of 15 specialists, and said the bullet that hit Miss Stubblefield caused a traumatic brain injury and severely impacted her hormones and sodium levels, as well as frontal lobe function. His team helped create a nasal passage for Miss Stubblefield, as well as patch her face and form jawbones using her fibula calf bone and titanium.  They moved her eyes closer together with a device that had to be tightened daily, and took part of her thigh and Achilles tendon to help cover the wounds. Her surgery was paid for by the US department of defence through the armed forces institute of regenerative medicine, in an effort to improve treatment for service members who are wounded in battle and come back with similar injuries.  Katie Stubblefield with her father Robb and mother Alesia Credit: National Geographic “Her injury may have been the worst injury of any face transplant injury ever,” he said.  “We can’t necessarily make all of her muscles move again. Her tongue is not working well because she lost a lot of tongue muscle and nerves.” But, he added, the team were delighted with the outcome. “We all like her nose,” he said. “Her lips are pretty.” Ms Bennington, the donor's grandmother, has recently met Miss Stubblefield, telling the young woman: “You look beautiful.” She said she could see elements of her granddaughter, but that the face was truly Miss Stubblefield’s. Fourteen months after the procedure, in July this year, her doctors had completed three major revision surgeries and are still likely to slim her face, reduce scarring, and improve her eyelids. Over time her face will continue to regain function. “I get a second chance at life now,” she said. “This is the beginning of another chapter.” September's issue of National Geographic is guest edited by Katie Piper, the philanthropist, television presenter and former model.

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  • There's always something to be happy about. From Good Housekeeping

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  • Florida International University has released time-lapse videos of its pedestrian bridge being installed and collapsing on a busy road- the public’s closest view yet of the deadly accident and the days leading up to it. Clearly seen on the videos are at least four workers standing atop the bridge moments before it fell. The workers were using a jack to re-tension, or tighten, the steel rods that ran through a crucial concrete support truss at the bridge’s north end. Their actions may have caused the bridge - which was already developing alarming cracks - to come crashing down. Who ordered the construction crew up there - and why - remains unclear. That information may be contained in documents

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